Love: Age-Old Tokens of Affection

The connection between love and jewellery is such an expansive subject, and one that I find infinitely fascinating.

The expression of love through jewellery has an incredibly long history which spans many cultures and civilisations. Part of a deep human need, it has been used as a signifier of marriage status, class, beauty and affection. When a piece of jewellery is exchanged between two people, it becomes a powerful symbol filled with memories and meaning, and carries on as a future heirloom.

From the early Byzantine wedding rings and ancient Roman jewels depicting two lovers, to the simple posey rings of the 16th-17th Century inscribed with 'Trew Love', there are many ways to express affection through jewels. I am enamoured with the engraved tokens that were gifted to loved ones, designed to accompany them on distant journeys and remind their bearer of the love and devotion left behind.

The 17th-18th Century Memento Mori jewels also hold spectacular fascination for me. Gold, pearls and gems were used in brooches to create a frame around the painted eye of the beloved, often incorporating a lock of their hair.

When I create my jewels today, I adore seeing the joy they bring. I love to think of my own pieces as the future heirlooms to be passed on for generations.

 

The connection between love and jewellery is such an expansive subject, and one that I find infinitely fascinating.

The expression of love through jewellery has an incredibly long history which spans many cultures and civilisations. Part of a deep human need, it has been used as a signifier of marriage status, class, beauty and affection. When a piece of jewellery is exchanged between two people, it becomes a powerful symbol filled with memories and meaning, and carries on as a future heirloom.

From the early Byzantine wedding rings and ancient Roman jewels depicting two lovers, to the simple posey rings of the 16th-17th Century inscribed with 'Trew Love', there are many ways to express affection through jewels. I am enamoured with the engraved tokens that were gifted to loved ones, designed to accompany them on distant journeys and remind their bearer of the love and devotion left behind.

The 17th-18th Century Memento Mori jewels also hold spectacular fascination for me. Gold, pearls and gems were used in brooches to create a frame around the painted eye of the beloved, often incorporating a lock of their hair.

When I create my jewels today, I adore seeing the joy they bring. I love to think of my own pieces as the future heirlooms to be passed on for generations.